Ebola

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A large outbreak of Ebola is occurring in West Africa and a very limited number of cases have now been reported in the United States. Although this Ebola outbreak is the largest in history, the risk for anyone outside West Africa remains extremely low. For an update on the countries affected by this outbreak and the number of outbreak-associated Ebola cases and deaths, please visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Ebola website.

Ebola is a rare and deadly disease caused by the Ebola virus. Symptoms begin between 2 and 21 days (most commonly 8-10 days) after exposure to the virus and include a fever greater than or equal to 100.4°F, severe headache, muscle pain, vomiting, diarrhea, stomach pain, or unexplained bleeding or bruising. No specific vaccine or medicine has been proven to prevent Ebola.

A person infected with Ebola is not contagious until their symptoms appear. The virus is spread through direct contact with the blood and body fluids of an ill person infected with Ebola, or with objects (like needles) that have been contaminated with the virus. Those at highest risk of being exposed to Ebola virus are healthcare providers caring for infected patients or family and friends who have had close contact with an ill person infected with Ebola.

Ebola does not pose a significant risk to the U.S. public. However, the CDC recommends that U.S. residents avoid nonessential travel to the African countries affected by this outbreak. See more on the CDC’s travel information page.

Information for the Public

County of San Diego

World Health Organization (WHO)

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

California Department of Public Health (CDPH)

Information for Healthcare Workers

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

California Department of Public Health (CDPH)

San Diego County Health and Human Services Agency (HHSA)

Information for Travelers

California Health Alert Network San Diego (CAHAN)

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

For more information, contact the Epidemiology Program 619-692-8499 or send us an e-mail.