Sector Frequently Asked Questions

This page is updated as needed. Last updated on 6/28/22.

Thank you for visiting the Sector Frequently Asked Questions page. Below are common questions asked from the community related to COVID-19 specific to each sector below. For General COVID-19 FAQs, visit the Frequently Asked Questions page.

Child Care Sector

Table of Contents

Decision Tree

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Clinical Questions

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Ratios

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Cleaning & Disinfecting

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  • What are the recommended guidelines for facility sanitation?
    • It is important to know the difference between cleaning, disinfecting, and sanitizing and when to do each to maintain a healthy child care environment and ensure the well-being of children in care. See Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidance on Cleaning and Disinfecting Your Facility for detailed information on infection control practices related to cleaning and disinfection.
      • Cleaning removes germs, dirt, and impurities from surfaces or objects. Cleaning works by using soap (or detergent) and water to physically remove germs from surfaces. This process does not necessarily kill germs, but by removing them, it lowers their numbers and the risk of spreading infection.
      • Disinfecting kills germs on surfaces or objects. Disinfecting works by using chemicals to kill germs on surfaces or objects. This process does not necessarily clean dirty surfaces or remove germs, but by killing germs on a surface after cleaning, it can further lower the risk of spreading infection.
      • Sanitizing lowers the number of germs on surfaces or objects to a safe level, as judged by public health standards or requirements. This process works by either cleaning or disinfecting surfaces or objects to lower the risk of spreading infection.
    • Please see California Department of Public Health (CDPH) Guidance for the latest information on cleaning and disinfection for Child Care Providers and Programs.

COVID-19 Reporting

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  • What do we do if a child, staff, or facility contact has a positive COVID-19 test?

    Isolate and report the incidents to the County, Community Care Licensing (CCL), and affected families.

    •  Isolate the individual with symptoms
      • Isolation is immediately required if a person meets one or more of the following criteria:
        • A confirmed positive diagnostic laboratory test for COVID-19; or
        • Signs and symptoms that are consistent with COVID-19 (cough, shortness of breath or trouble breathing, fatigue, fever or chills, muscle or body aches, headache, sore throat, new loss of taste or smell, congestion or runny nose, nausea or vomiting, or diarrhea); or
        • A physician has informed the individual that they are likely to have COVID-19.
      • Report the case to the County 
        • If a child, staff, or facility contact has tested positive for COVID-19, please contact the Epidemiology Unit by phone at (619) 692-8499, or complete the Online COVID-19 Notification Form. Calling is preferred for outbreak reporting. For urgent matters on evenings, weekends, or holidays, dial (858) 565-5255 and ask for the Epidemiology Unit duty officer.
        • Childcare providers must report to the local health department (see above) the presence, or suspected presence, of any communicable diseases (see the California Code of Regulations for more information).
      • Report the case to CCL
        • If a child, staff, or facility contact has tested positive for COVID-19, please contact the local CCL regional office within 24 hours. To reach a Licensing Duty Officer, call (619) 767-2200 and press #3.
        • Submit an Unusual Incident Report (LIC 624 or LIC624B) within 7 days of reporting the case to the assigned Licensing Program Analyst or Regional Office. Please include the contact with Epidemiology or Public Health Official with recommendations in the report.
        • Follow California Department of Public Health (CDPH) Guidance for Child Care Providers and Programs.

     

Hand Sanitizer

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  • Are there any recommendations for hand sanitizer?
    • Hand Sanitizer should contain at least 60% ethyl alcohol (preferred) or at least 70% isopropyl alcohol (a neurotoxin and eye irritant). WARNING: Do not use any products that contain methanol.
    • Closely supervise young children using hand sanitizer to prevent swallowing hand sanitizer because it can cause alcohol poisoning.
    • Hand sanitizer may be used under adult supervision only and must be kept out of children’s reach. Call Poison Control if consumed: 800-222-1222. Note that frequent handwashing is more effective than the use of hand sanitizers. Hand sanitizer must be rubbed into children’s hands until completely dry. Hand sanitizer is not recommended for children under 24 months.
    • Please refer to CDPH Child Care GuidanceCalifornia Poison Control Organization, and the When and How to Wash Your Hands page for more information.
  • Where should we store hand sanitizer?

    From Title 22 Licensing Regulations:

    § 101238(g). Buildings and Grounds: Disinfectants, cleaning solutions, poisons, and other items that could pose a danger, if readily available to children, shall be stored where inaccessible to children.

    AND

    § 102417(g)(4). Operation of a Family Child Care Home: Poisons, detergents, cleaning compounds, medicines, firearms, and other items which could pose a danger if readily available to children, shall be stored where they are inaccessible to children.

Testing

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Stay Up-to-Date

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ECE Telebriefing

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For additional questions and resources, please email:

COVID-EarlyCare@sdcounty.ca.gov

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Health Professionals

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

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For additional questions and resources, please email:

MCSDCallCenter.HHSAs@sdcounty.ca.gov

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Homeless Sector

Table of Contents

Data

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  • Is the County tracking positive COVID-19 tests and clusters among the homeless population?

    The County tracks the number of persons experiencing homelessness (PEH) who test positive for COVID-19 as well as clusters, recognizing that the data for people who are homeless may only reflect the location where the individual was tested. Information on positive cases and other COVID-19 statistics can be found on the County COVID-19 Dashboard.

    A summary of cases among PEH is released weekly, and a link to the data is included in the homeless sector email updates. Per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), there is an expected delay in reporting COVID cases among homeless people because the data has not been uniformly collected at a national level.

Outreach

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Resources/Supplies

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Shelters

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For additional questions and resources, please email:

COVID-Homeless@sdcounty.ca.gov

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Institutions of Higher Education

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Colleges & Universities

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  • What responsibilities do schools have related to COVID-19?

    Institutions of Higher Education (IHE) administrators can help protect students, faculty, and staff slow the spread of COVID-19 by encouraging vaccinations and using Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Guidance for IHEs. IHEs can help increase vaccine uptake among students, faculty, and staff by providing information about COVID-19 vaccination, promoting vaccine trust and confidence, and establishing supportive policies and practices that make getting vaccinated as easy and convenient as possible.

    IHEs, where not everyone is fully vaccinated, will have a mixed population of people who are fully vaccinated and people who are not fully vaccinated on campus—which requires decision making to protect the people who are not fully vaccinated.

  • Is there anything we can do for each other when feeling overwhelmed?

    Seek help when needed. If distress impacts daily activities for several days or weeks, talk to a counselor, doctor, faith leader, or contact the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) helpline at 1-800-985-5990.

    Visit the County Behavioral Health Services website for resources to help manage mental health and coping during COVID-19, and the County mental health and wellness handout for tips and recommendations. Each Mind Matters, a County of San Diego Live Well Partner, also has mental health resources and tips for self-care during COVID-19.

    The County of San Diego initiated the LiveWell@Home website containing age-based resources to encourage fitness and social connection during difficult times. 2-1-1 San Diego also provides information about local mental health and wellness resources.

Guidance

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  • Where can we find guidance for events?

    Beyond the Blueprint Framework for Industry and Business Sectors. This document contains information for any venues (including food and retail) on campus, sporting events, and large indoor/outdoor live performances that may be considered Mega Events.

  • What guidance do IHE follow for COVID-19

    IHE must follow:

    Colleges and universities can further plan by following current CDC Recommendations for Colleges, Universities, and Higher Learning, including Guidance for Shared or Congregate Housing.

    CDC, CDPH, and the County of San Diego continues to strongly recommend COVID-19 vaccinations and boosters for all residents, including eligible students, faculty, staff, volunteers, contractors, and others. Campuses should consider maintaining regular testing protocols for those individuals who are not vaccinated, and refer to level of community transmission of COVID-19 for optimal implementation of prevention strategies. Masks, physical distancing, and ventilation should be considered for ongoing safety measures.

    • Consistently and correctly wear a well-fitting fitted mask protects others as well as themselves. Consistent and correct mask use by people who are not up to date on their vaccines is especially important indoors and in crowded settings, and when physical distancing cannot be maintained. CDC has information on different types of masks and respirators.
      • Indoors: Everyone ages 2 years and older who are not up to date with their COVID-19 vaccines should properly wear a well-fitting mask indoors in public in areas, regardless of community transmission. Everyone who is up to date with their COVID-19 vaccines should wear a mask indoors in public in areas of substantial or high community transmission.
      • Outdoors: In general, people do not need to wear masks when outdoors. In areas of substantial or high transmission, people might choose to wear a mask outdoors when in sustained close contact with other people, particularly if
        • They or someone they live with has a weakened immune system or is at increased risk for severe disease.
        • They are not up to date on COVID-19 vaccines or live with someone who is not up to date on COVID-19 vaccines.
    • Physical distancing means keeping space of at least 6 feet (about 2 arm lengths) between people who are not in the same household in both indoor and outdoor spaces. In general, CDC recommends people who are not up to date on their COVID-19 vaccines should continue to practice physical distancing, especially if they are at higher risk of getting very sick with COVID-19.
      • Gatherings, events, and visitors. Crowded settings still present a greater risk of transmission among people who are not up to date with their vaccines, especially when they bring together people of unknown vaccination status from different communities where community transmission is high. People who are not up to date with their vaccines should continue to avoid large gatherings, but if they choose to attend, they should wear well-fitting masks that cover the mouth and nose, maintain physical distancing, and practice good hand hygiene. For mixed campus IHEs, in-person instruction should be prioritized over extracurricular activities, including sports and school events, to minimize risk of transmission in schools and to protect in-person learning.
      • Shared housing (such as dormitories) in IHE settings is considered a congregate setting. People living and working in this type of housing may have challenges with physical distancing and other prevention strategies to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Shared housing includes a broad range of settings, such as dormitories, apartments, condominiums, student or faculty/staff housing, and fraternity and sorority housing. Roommates/suite-mates can be considered a household and do not need to use masks or physically distance within the household “unit” (e.g., dorm room or suite) unless someone in the household has symptoms or has tested positive.
      • Food service and communal dining areas. Avoid crowding in areas with high levels of community transmission, stagger use of dining areas, and reduce seating capacity, and use markers and guides to ensure that people remain at least 6 feet apart when waiting in line to order or pick up.
    • Improving ventilation is an important COVID-19 prevention strategy for IHEs. Along with other preventive strategies, protective ventilation practices and interventions can reduce the airborne concentration of viral particles and reduce the overall viral dose to occupants. For more specific information about maintenance and use of ventilation equipment and other ventilation considerations, refer to:
    • Additional ventilation recommendations for different types of IHE buildings can be found in the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) schools and universities guidance document.

    The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Resocialization of College Sports document provides information for resuming sports practice and competition, including determination of risk levels and prevention, mitigation, and treatment of COVID-19 for student-athletes.

    Refer to CDPH Education and Childcare page, under Higher Education, for additional resources.

Masks

Testing

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Travel

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For additional questions and resources, please email:

COVID-Education@sdcounty.ca.gov

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K-12

Table of Contents

School COVID-19 Vaccine

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  • How can health care professionals, such as school nurses, sign up to administer vaccines?

    Individuals interested in volunteering to administer the vaccine can complete the online application at https://www.healthcarevolunteers.ca.gov. Website administrators are committed to processing applications as quickly as possible and will acknowledge applications within 24-48 hours. Interested volunteers will be contacted directly with volunteer assignments. Please do not self-deploy to a site. Interested volunteers can also sign up via the San Diego Medical Reserve Corps here.

  • How can a school district become a vaccine distribution site?

    Sites interested in administering the COVID-19 vaccine, that have equipment such as a temperature monitored refrigerator, must be enrolled in the federal COVID-19 Vaccination Program. The federal government will procure and distribute vaccines and ancillary supplies at no cost to enrolled, approved COVID-19 vaccination providers. The California Department of Public Health (CDPH) coordinates enrollment for the region. 

    • Potential vaccination sites will need to meet all requirements before enrolling. This includes being actively listed in the San Diego Immunization Registry (SDIR).
    • Interested schools can enroll in SDIR at SDIR.HHSA@sdcounty.ca.gov, or calling the SDIR Help Desk at (619) 692-5656 for assistance.
    • For additional information, please visit the California COVID-19 Vaccination Program website.
    • For questions about the enrollment process or need technical assistance, please contact the County of San Diego’s COVID-19 Vaccine Branch at COVIDVaxEnrollment.HHSA@sdcounty.ca.gov or (858) 569-3300.
  • How can a school host a vaccination event?

    Schools can request a pop-up through the California Coronavirus COVID-19 Response Toolkit at Mobile Vaccinations | Covid19Toolkit (CA.gov). Schools may also request to host a vaccination event through Live Well San Diego at Request to Host a Vaccination Event (Smartsheet.com).

  • If an educator has had COVID-19, does this impact their ability to get the vaccine?

    Persons who have tested positive for COVID-19 need to wait until after isolation to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. Educators who received monoclonal antibodies for treatment for COVID-19 infection do not have to wait to get vaccinated.

    Data from clinical trials indicate that COVID-19 vaccines are safe in persons with a history of COVID-19 infection. Vaccinations should be offered to persons regardless of history of prior symptomatic or asymptomatic infection. Vaccination of persons with known current COVID-19 infection should be deferred until the person has recovered from the acute illness (if the person had symptoms) and have met the criteria to discontinue isolation. This recommendation applies to persons who develop COVID-19 before receiving any vaccine doses and those who develop COVID-19 after the first dose but before the second dose. For more information, visit CDC Considerations for the Use of COVID-19 Vaccines.

  • If someone experiences symptoms after receiving the vaccine, how is it determined if it is a reaction to the vaccine or symptoms of a COVID-19 infection?

    It is not uncommon to have mild to moderate reactions following any immunization. Common side effects after COVID-19 vaccinations include local soreness, itching and/or swelling at the injection site, fever, fatigue, headache, nausea, chills, and muscle and joint aches. Most of these post-vaccination symptoms are mild to moderate in severity. Symptoms occurring within the first three days of vaccination (the day of vaccination and the following two days, with most symptoms occurring the day after vaccination), and resolving within 1-2 days of onset, can be treated with acetaminophen, ibuprofen, or naproxen. Symptoms can be more frequent and severe following the second dose of the vaccine among younger persons compared to those who are older (>55 years). However, cough, shortness of breath, rhinorrhea, sore throat, or loss of taste or smell are not consistent with post-vaccination symptoms and might be symptoms of SARS-CoV-2 or another infection. Those experiencing these symptoms should be medically evaluated and tested for COVID-19 and/or other infections. San Diego County Office of Education (SDCOE) has posted a letter, Common Side Effects of Moderna, Pfizer, and Johnson & Johnson Vaccines during COVID-19 Pandemic, with more information.

  • If an individual has been vaccinated, do they still need to isolate if symptomatic?

    Someone who is symptomatic should not be at school. Anyone showing symptoms should isolate themselves, follow the COVID-19 Decision Tree, and test for COVID-19 infection. The immune system is most prepared to fight COVID-19 about two weeks after the second dose in a two-dose series or two weeks after the first dose in a single-dose vaccine. 

  • If an individual was vaccinated, should they still participate in routine testing?

    Vaccinated individuals should still participate in routine staff screening and testing for COVID-19. While current COVID-19 vaccines are shown to effectively reduce illness and hospitalizations from this virus, research continues to learn how well they prevent those who are immunized from becoming infected, or transmitting the virus, if they do become infected. Vaccinated individuals should participate in school screening programs and get tested if symptoms of COVID-19 infection develop. Please continue to follow the SDCOE K-12 Decision Tree guidance.  

  • Do I have to wear a mask or socially distance if I'm vaccinated?

    Review the CDPH Guidance for the Use of Face Coverings, which applies to all settings, including schools. For more information, visit the CDPH Face Covering Q&A Page

  • Do minors need to show proof of eligibility to get a vaccine?

    Items required at the time of vaccination depend on a person’s age. For vaccine-eligible minors, based on their age, requirements vary depending on whether an adult (18 years and older) will be present when the minor receives the vaccine. Visit the County’s Vaccine Website for more details on the different scenarios for minors. 

  • Do you recommend requiring volunteers to be vaccinated?

    The CDPH Guidance states, “Schools should limit nonessential visitors, volunteers, and activities involving external groups or organizations with people who are not fully vaccinated, particularly in areas where there is moderate-to-high COVID-19 community transmission.” It is recommended that all eligible individuals get vaccinated. Anyone involved with K-12 schools (e.g., volunteers or contract workers) are highly recommended to get vaccinated. Cal/OSHA Emergency Temporary Standards do not specifically address volunteers. It is recommended that a school contact their Human Resources department for more information on volunteer requirements. 

Guidance & Reopening Plans

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Cases & School Closures

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Screening & Testing

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School-Based Programs

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Cleaning & Hygiene

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Isolation & Quarantine

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Masks or Face Coverings

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  • What is the mask guidance for students and staff?

    The following guidance is available from CDPH COVID-19 Public Health Guidance for K-12 Schools in California, 2021-22 School Year:

    • No person can be prevented from wearing a mask as a condition of participation in an activity or entry into a school, unless wearing a mask would pose a safety hazard (e.g., watersports).
    • CDPH strongly recommends that all persons (e.g., students and staff) wear masks in K-12 indoor settings, with consideration of exemptions per CDPH face mask guidance.
    • Persons exempted from wearing a face covering due to a medical condition are strongly recommended to wear a non-restrictive alternative, such as a face shield with a drape on the bottom edge, as long as their condition permits it.
    • Schools must develop and implement local protocols to provide masks to students who inadvertently fail to bring a face covering to school and desire to use one.
    • Public schools should be aware of the requirements in AB 130 (Chapter 44 of the Statutes of 2021) to offer independent study programs for the 2021-22 school year.
    • In situations where use of masks is challenging due to pedagogical or developmental reasons, (e.g., communicating or assisting young children or those with special needs), a face shield with a drape (per CDPH guidelines) (PDF) may be considered instead of a mask while in the classroom.

School-Based Operations

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  • Do students need to remain in cohorts?

    No. However, maintaining cohorts and/or stable groups is a best practice and a strong component of a layered mitigation approach. Stable groups help minimize spread and facilitate group contact notification. 

Air Filtration

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  • What are the recommendations for air filtration in classrooms?
    • Airflow and ventilation enhancements are recommended where practicable. 
      • Keep windows and doors open for cross ventilation. If this is not possible, make sure that Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) systems are operating to clear the air of small airborne particles.
    • The CDC has information about air filtration and ventilation, including considerations for operating schools during COVID-19, and indoor environmental quality.
    • Have a Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) specialist review the school’s system so that particulate matter (2.5 microns) is in an acceptable range. Recommendations may include:
      • Changing ventilation settings so "air changes per hour" is set to a minimum of 5 changes per hour, and/or
      • Use MERV 13 if your HVAC system has the capacity for these filters, or
      • Place one or more HEPA filters/air purifiers per room to filter the air of small particles.
    • Turn off classroom ceiling fans, and do not use a desk or floor fans. Even if a classroom has air filters, fans should only be used to exhaust room air out a window. Fans that merely circulate the air in a closed space are not recommended.
    • Use either carbon dioxide monitors or particle counters (2.5 microns) to measure the quality of the classroom's ventilation when it is occupied. Use particle counters if your system has MERV 13 filters or HEPA room air purifiers. Carbon dioxide monitors are no longer a good proxy for the air quality in terms of COVID-19. 
  • What is the guidance for central heaters and space heaters?

    There is no evidence that portable space heaters directly create an increased risk of COVID-19. The American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) recommends keeping occupied spaces heated to normal levels because spending time under thermal stress, such as excessively cold spaces, can lower resistance to infection.

    However, there are other issues to consider when selecting and operating a space heater. Be aware that unvented combustion space heaters (e.g., using kerosene, propane, or natural gas) release combustion products into the indoor air. These contaminants can build up to unacceptable or even hazardous levels without adequate ventilation. Unvented combustion emits nitrogen dioxide (NO2), a reactive oxygen species and a known breathing irritant, that could increase susceptibility to respiratory infections, such as COVID-19. Unvented combustion-based heaters are banned in some jurisdictions. Electric space heaters do not pose those risks. The placement of any portable heater requires some thought and care to avoid overheating any nearby materials.

    See ASHRAE FAQs for more information.

  • We have purchased air purifiers for use in our classrooms. The purifiers are more effective with doors/windows closed, but health guidance suggests we keep doors/windows open. Is there any guidance as to whether doors/windows should still stay open if air purifiers are in use in classrooms

    In-room/portable air cleaners should be used in rooms where adequate ventilation with outdoor air cannot be maintained. Purifiers work better when the fan is constantly running. Their noise may affect where they are placed in the classroom. A portable air cleaner will be much more effective for a specific room when any exterior doors and windows in a room are closed. If there are concerns about an air filtration system, keep the windows open. Air quality can also be tested with a particle counter. 

    Additionally, the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Technical Summary of Residential Air Cleaners states, on page 37, “the air cleaner should not be situated where walls, furniture, curtains, and other obstructions will block the intake and outlet. Manufacturer instructions may indicate that the air cleaner is placed a certain distance from any objects that might obstruct airflow.”

  • Where can I get additional ventilation information and resources?

    The CA Safe Schools for All for ventilation guidance and the CA COVID-19 School Readiness Hub for potential funding opportunities.

Activities

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Childcare

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Student Technology Resources

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Immunizations

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Mental Health

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Nutrition

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Physical Activity

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Recovery

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Safety

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School Meals

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For additional questions and resources, please email:

COVID-Education@sdcounty.ca.gov

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Military & Veterans

Table of Contents

General Questions

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Veterans

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VA Hospital

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Active Duty Military

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Veterans Living Abroad

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  • What can veterans living abroad do about medicines provided by the VA?

    VA hospitals continue to mail prescriptions to the service member’s place of residence. However, VA Hospital providers cannot travel to Mexico to provide physical care because they are not licensed to work in Mexico. The veteran should call their healthcare provider before going to the VA hospital for further assistance on how to proceed.

  • Will telehealth be made available to veterans living in Mexico?

    Yes, telehealth is available to veterans living in Mexico, depending on if they have the technological capabilities. VA healthcare personnel are not licensed in Mexico. However, they can prescribe something to be picked up locally.

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For additional questions and resources, please email:

COVID-Military-Veterans@sdcounty.ca.gov

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Older Adults & Disability

Table of Contents

COVID-19 Vaccine

COVID-19 Prevention & Treatment

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  • What should I do if I get COVID-19?
    • Get treated if eligible. There are two options available to treat COVID-19 infection. These include monoclonal antibodies and oral treatment.
      • Monoclonal antibodies, via IV infusion, is available at theMonoclonal Antibody Regional Centers (MARCs) to treat persons 12 years of age or older with mild to moderate COVID-19 symptoms within 7 days.
        • Where?
          • MARC at Vista Community Clinic (open Tuesday - Friday)
          • MARC at Clairemont Friendship Center in Clairmont (open Monday - Saturday
          • MARC at San Ysidro Health in Chula Vista (open Wednesday - Sunday)
          • Family Health Centers of San Diego in Hillcrest (open Tuesday - Friday)
        • Video on MARC: English | Spanish/Español
        • For more information, visit the County MARC page or email COVIDTreatment@sdcounty.ca.gov.
        • Call (619) 685-2500 with questions and/or to schedule an appointment directly.  
      • Oral treatment, such as Paxlovid, is available as a 5-day course for individuals who have mild to moderate symptoms of COVID-19 infection.
        • Where?
          • Please call 1-888-634-1123 to schedule an appointment at an OptumServe site for testing and treatment with Paxlovid, if eligible. 
    • Isolate at home or in a safe place. Instructions outlined in the document Home Isolation Instructions for Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), issued by San Diego County and California public health officials, are for people confirmed to have COVID-19 or clinically suspected to have COVID-19. This document is available in the following nine languages:
    • Contact your healthcare provider. Anyone with symptoms consistent with   COVID-19 should immediately connect with a healthcare provider. 
      • Those without a primary care provider can call 2-1-1 to be connected with one.
    • The CDC Steps When Sick page also has information on steps to take when symptoms of COVID-19 are present.
  • What is the best way to prevent the spread of COVID-19 in congregate settings, such as in an independent senior living community
    • Vaccines are the most effective tool to help prevent the spread of COVID-19, but vaccines are not the only tool. Even after being fully vaccinated, everyone should continue to take preventive measures. 
    • The following additional actions also help to protect against COVID-19:
      • Washing hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds,
      • Practice physical distancing, and
      • Wear a face covering in indoor spaces where air is shared.
    • Visit the County About Coronavirus (COVID-19) page to learn how the virus spreads, symptoms, and how to stay protected.
    • For Guidance related to care in Residential Care Facilities for the Elderly (RCFE’s), also known as Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing Facilities, and other residential care facilities, please see the Long-Term Care and Residential Care Facilities Sector page. 
  • If I believe I might have been exposed to COVID-19, what safety precautions should I take?
    • Regardless of your COVID-19 vaccine status, if you do not have COVID-19 symptoms (asymptomatic), you do not need to quarantine. However, there are recommended actions:
      • Take a COVID-19 test (either PCR or antigen) 3-5 days after the last exposure.
      • Wear a well-fitted face covering for a total of 10 days after exposure, especially in indoor settings and when near those at higher risk for severe COVID-19.
      • Monitor your health for COVID-19 symptoms through day 10.

Programs, Services, & Resources

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Ways to Help

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For additional questions and resources, please email:

COVID-AIS@sdcounty.ca.gov

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Restaurant, Food, & Beverage Providers

Beverage Providers

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For additional questions and resources, please email:

COVID-Questions@sdcounty.ca.gov